Review Webinar: Engaging Individuals who have Experienced Chronic Homelessness

If you were unable to attend the HUD webinar: Engaging Individuals who have Experienced Chronic Homelessness hosted by The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) on July 18th, you can go to the link to review an archived recording of the discussion.

The webinar includes:

  • Motivational Interviewing and techniques to meet people where they are.
  • How to apply harm reduction principles with Housing First through crisis housing.
  • Housing individuals with active substance abuse and psychiatric conditions.
  • Collaborations that can improve housing stability and whole health.
  • How integrated health, behavioral health, and housing services using Housing First can improve a person’s housing stability and wellbeing.

If you have questions or issues, please email webevents@ahpnet.com.

Register for HUD Webinar: Engaging Individuals who have Experienced Chronic Homelessness (July 18th)

Register Now!

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) invites you to attend a panel discussion on how recovery happens even for people who have spent most of their lives without housing.

How can I reach someone who seems unaware that help is possible? How can I assist someone to set meaningful goals when they say that they have given up? If you have considered any of these questions then this webinar is for you! Our expert presenters will discuss:

  • Motivational Interviewing and techniques to meet people where they are.
  • How to apply harm reduction principles with Housing First through crisis housing.
  • Housing individuals with active substance abuse and psychiatric conditions.
  • Collaborations that can improve housing stability and whole health.
  • How integrated health, behavioral health, and housing services using Housing First can improve a person’s housing stability and wellbeing.

Susan Pfefferle, Ph.D., from Abt Associates, will moderate presentations and discussion among:

  • Pat Tucker, MBA, MA, Advocates for Human Potential
  • Frances E. Isbell, MA, CEO, Healthcare for the Homeless Houston
  • Cathy Crouch, Executive Vice President, SEARCH Housing Services
  • Daniel Malone, MPH, Executive Director, Downtown Emergency Service Center (DESC)

Webinar Details:

Date: Tuesday, July 18, 2017
Time: 11:30 AM to 1:00 PM ET

Register Now!

This webinar is the third in HHRN’s Outreach and Engagement: Evidence-based Practices that Promote Recovery and Resilience.

LGBT Sensitivity Training Wrap Up

On June 30th, 2017, 211OC hosted an LGBT Sensitivity Training session presented by the LGBTQ Center of Long Beach and learned a lot about how to best serve our LGBTQ clients experiencing homelessness. Please feel free to look through the slides that were presented today to get a feel for what we discussed.

In a nutshell, here are some best practices that we went over:

  • Service providers should affirm and accept clients’ identities without invasive questioning or invalidation. This lines up with HUD’s guidance for data elements 3.4 Race, 3.5 Ethnicity, and 3.6 Gender which specify in the HMIS Data Standards manual that “staff observations should not be used to collect information” on race, gender, or ethnicity.
  • In order to foster a safe environment, our agencies should be actively affirming of LGBTQ clients. Our presenters told us that LGBTQ clients are very likely to check out a provider’s website before accessing services, and that seeing a small rainbow icon or some other indicator  on the website that the agency is a safe place for LGBTQ clients makes them feel more comfortable approaching the agency for services. LGBTQ clients generally do not assume they will be treated with compassion so adding an affirming icon or banner to your website is a great way to let LGBTQ clients know they are welcome before they take that big step first of contacting an agency to ask for help. Prominent LGBTQ affirming signage in your physical offices or any place clients might seek help are also very helpful.
  • Laws and regulations do not provide LGBTQ clients with complete protections. For example, although same sex marriage is legal federally, some states and counties continue to resist granting LGBTQ people marriage licenses. Just because anti-discrimination laws exist does not mean that discrimination against LGBTQ people has disappeared. In order to help enforce these legal protections, it is important that agencies have anti-discrimination policies in place and make supporting LGBTQ clients an ongoing conversation inside the agency.
  • If you have questions, the LGBTQ Center of Long Beach is happy to help! In the very last slide of the presentation you will find contact information for today’s presenter, Joel Gemino. You can reach Joel by email at jgemino@centerlb.org or by phone at (562) 434-4455 ex. 227. Joel is happy to help any service provider who has questions or concerns about serving LGBTQ clients.

Thanks so much to everyone who was able to make it to this training!

FREE LGBT Sensitivity Training Scheduled for 6/30/17

211OC will host a FREE LGBT Sensitivity Training for all Orange County homeless service providers on Friday June 30th from 10AM to 12PM. A representative from the Long Beach LGBT Center will conduct the training which will consist of a presentation and Q&A session.

Where? CASA Training Room (Upstairs) 1505 E 17th. St Santa Ana, CA 92705
When? Friday, 6/30/17, from 10AM to 12PM.

We are hoping at least one representative from each of our agencies can attend this important training. According to HUD “[m]embers of the LGBT community are more likely to become homeless, and once homeless, more likely to endure discrimination and harassment that extends their homelessness.” We want Orange County’s CoC to be a safe and welcoming place for all LGBT clients experiencing homelessness, and we hope that this training will help us serve this marginalized population better!

There is no need to RSVP for this event, please just show up ready to learn!

OC LGBT History Fun Fact: In April 1972, Costa Mesa resident John Rule installed a pink mail box outside his house to mark the founding of what eventually became the Orange County Gay & Lesbian Community Services Center, one of the first in the nation. Because it was not safe to advertise the purpose of Rule’s house, the pink mailbox let community members know that they were in the right place.

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